Saturday, October 25, 2008

EOF

It was fun while it lasted folks. I'm closing up shop. Moving on.


It turns out, the more hate I dished out, the less I had to hate on. Lusers keep making the same damn mistakes. These days, I wonder if they're not producing yet another 10-reasons-why-Linux-is-better article just to rope me along.

Let's just say, eventually, one moves beyond anger. Like the five phases of grief, or something. Eventually you get to acceptance. Accepting that lusers are going to continue in their freetarded ways whatever you do, however much you try to embarass them in a public forum.

So in true open source fashion, as the maintainer of this project, I am going to arbitrarily drop off the face off the of this earth for purely selfish reasons, and leave the entire cause in limbo. That is how open source projects truly die. But hey, all the material is out there for y'all to see (it's "open source" in it's own way), so maybe someone else will take up the cause. Carry on, lusers!

893 flames:

«Oldest   ‹Older   1 – 200 of 893   Newer›   Newest»
Anonymous said...

Oh, come on. At least come clean about your background.

Bobby Mac said...

I'm gonna miss your rants dude...

Anonymous said...

at least you converted me, dude!

Anonymous said...

I hate ATI/AMD because their drivers suck on all platforms (oh yeah, I JUST LOVE *16* COLORS IN WINDOWS AND MY MONITOR TURNING OFF FOR NO REASON).

I hate the lack of cooperation on solving common problems in Linux - the "let's do the same thing just a little bit differently because the other guys don't get it" syndrome. There's no real solution to this. Just do the same bloody thing and fork, fork, fork like crazy. Evolution, survival of the fittest. I guess it works in some weird way but that doesn't change a thing about me hating it.

Otherwise, there's not much to hate.

Anonymous said...

Linux has won.

Anonymous said...

As long as there are people willing to troll and flame the idiots that infest Digg and Slashdot, Linux hater shall never die!

Anonymous said...

At least leave the comment board open! The freetards will still attempt to convert the masses.

Anonymous said...

A very fitting end to the blog. I've laughed and winced in equal measure to many of your posts.

Thank you.

freetard said...

VICTORY IS OURS!

Anonymous said...

With the great enemy fallen, a GNU dawn approaches. An age of FREEDOM! And all will know that 300 freetards on the Internets fought to defend it!

ChazFrench said...

I hope you choose to write another blog on any topic. I would subscribe just for your writing style.

I've enjoyed your posts.

Peace,
Chaz

Ian said...

Shit!

I didn't agree with everything you said but your posts were fun and usually had valid criticisms. I'll miss this blog.

Richard Stallman's alter boy said...

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls

Victory dance baby!

Daengbo said...

This blog was serious? I always thought you were just trolling for page views. Hint: it was all the tiny errors and minor misinformation that made me think so.

Anonymous said...

As much as your blog was sometimes overexaggeration and rants just for the sake of ranting, you had good points many times about "quality" of big part of OSS software and about weaknesses of the whole process and 'free philosophy'. I hope you made a difference.

Good luck :)

cysquatch said...

A perfect ending to a great run.

Cheers to you and whatever you move on to!

Anonymous said...

Noooooooo!

Anon E Moose said...

"Linux has won."

Yes, your collective has bored another person into submission.

It's like winning a game because the other team failed to show up.

hoo-ray for you.

Cya later Linux Hater. It's been fun.

Anonymous said...

Why not have guests blog on your site? Lots of material out there...

Anonymous said...

Schade, ein Edeltroll gibt auf. War immer spaßig hier zu lesen

Long time hater, first time caller said...

I'll miss this blog. It taught me to appreciate Linux as one appreciates a paranoid dysfunctional insolvent hippie cousin.

Keep on writing, hater, if not here then elsewhere. You have a real gift.

Jonathan Allen said...

I'm sorry to see you go. It was a fun ride while it lasted.

I can't say I learned anything useful, but it sure was funny.

Anonymous said...

....meh....

Anonymous said...

Unlike these other losers, I did learn from your posts. (Stuff like just why the NVIDIA vendor driver is so much better than the remaining crap for X11, project braindeadedness, links to struggling experienced developers, other software developers with much more clue than the average freetard about how to run a project, the irony of Greg "Dipshit" Kroah-Hartman completely failing to transcode to a freetard format, etc.)

You had a good run, and you will be missed.

Anonymous said...

Some pop the champagne. It's time to party like its 1999!

DING DONG LINUX HATER IS DEAD. WHICH OLD HATER? THE LINUX HATER! DING DONG LINUX HATER IS DEAD!

THE INTERNET BELONGS TO GNU. RESISTANCE IS FUTILE WINTARDS.

Anonymous said...

Linux needs an Official Opposition, an informed Chief Critic. It's open source, so the problems can often be fixed once identified. Developers can become insulated from their users or the public, and make mistakes or ignore issues that don't affect them. Linux Hater Blog helped accurately identify the issues, drawing attention to problems, with a little humour too.

I regretfully unsubscribe from your RSS feed.

Takuan Daikon said...

It was fun while it lasted. Take care!!!

Anonymous said...

So, Miguel I take this is the part in which you run out of ideas so make this pathetic post so people ask you to come back. Aw, so lame.

"Linux Hater Blog helped accurately identify the issues"

No, Linux hater blog is a bunch of overrated uninformed BS. If you want criticism go find that which comes from non-anonymous users and developers instead of this guy.

Anonymous said...

right when i was hoping to see a new insightful critic on linux 's printing system, shell, API volatility, my favourite blog shuts down...
there's no justice in this world :-(

Linux user said...

Dear Linux Hater,

Please before you leave us for good, compile your hating into a book. A manual for the freetard. A bible for how to not screw Linux over and over again by breaking APIs, ABIs, rewriting perfectly decent code for no good reason other than nerdgasms.

Please, please, Linux is not beyond saving, we (you) just need to educate those overzealous college freetards. Get them before they have the chance to mess up the code base, just before they graduate and leave to work on project at some company where their idiocy will be closely reviewed.

Please make the bible, and we collectively shall turn it into required reading for all the wannabe freetard developers out there.

Yours truly,

Linux user.

Fire said...

Fun times. As most of my Linux boot-attempts would say:

>>Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

Anonymous said...

Yeah, your blog kind of ran out of steam, but I enjoyed it while it lasted. Nice job.

Anonymous said...

This makes reading Slashdot a lot less fun. I loved reading Slashdot for the purpose and coming here and seeing how you tear the Linux fan articles apart. Please come back :(

Anonymous said...

It was fun while it lasted. Thanks for the laughs.

Shamil said...

Hey retard. In true opensource philosophy, drop off the face of this earth while handing the project to someone else. Plz give out the login info for your linux haters blog so that someone can resume your project or fork it with taking a good look at your source first.
LMFAO

Anonymous said...

This blog was decent when the rants focused on technical issues, such as X11 and it's OpenGL driver infrastructure. However, the quality of this blog and it's commentary have since degraded to merely a pissing match between Wintards and Freetard lusers.

But we must ask ourselves how relevant this blog was. Linux's PC marketshare informs us that virtually nobody in the consumer public is using it. Therefore if nobody is using it then they probably aren't even aware of it's problems nor care.

This implies to me that had Linux been largely free of issues that it would still be irrelevant to the public because the of the general resistance to change.

Shamil said...

I WANT TO SEE THE LOGIN INFO NOW FOR YOUR BLOG! In true opensource fashion, pass the project along to someone else.

Stilgar said...

I believe after a few years Linux Hater will return. Just like rock bands make reunions. Just like Bruce Dickinson returned to Iron Maiden Linux Hater will return with even more hate and will scare the shit out of freetards who, just like vegetarians, are not used to opposition because no serious person ever payed any attention to them and so they pick lone victims and brainwash them with their propaganda.

Anonymous said...

No just Linux Hater is just jumping ship before the changes come that undo his key arguments.

Fragmentation solution on way.
Stability of GUI solution on way.
Ok Audio is going to say a mess of a while to come but its not a show stopper issue. If you can show graphics to user they can test there audio and select interface that works on install.

Problem is it is no longer freetards behind Linux. Instead its commercial companies out to make profit. The commercial companies just happen to include motherboard makers.

Linux market market share has grown. Direct side effect is dropping Microsoft profits as they are forced to keep on reducing price to slow growth down. Linux Haters rants have done nothing to stop this.

Linux will just keep appearing in more devices.

Linux ISV's vs Distributions over the next 12 months could get quite active.

Distributions have been Linux main model. It would have been interesting to see Linux Hater comment when the new model appears.

Forking like mad is kinda a myth. If you follow projects most forks either die off become dominate or get merged back in.

Distribution forking is another matter its caused by the design of the Distribution model that everything comes from one place.

The ISV model everything on your desktop can come from different servers and be 1 binary for all distrobutions/Versions out there.

MS Windows and Mac OS X are both ISV models. Linux with a ISV model to applications kinda stuffs Linux Haters fights a lot. Also stuffs up a lot of distribution forking.

Good example is something like edubuntu there is no reason when the ISV model lands why edubuntu could not cease being a distribution but instead be a set of generic packages for all distrobutions.

Major cause of Linux Distrobution forking is lack of means to bundle applications as a kit independent to distrobutions. This is exactly what Linux ISV's want to do.

Next is distrobutions have formed a citadel model. So X feature gets added to 1 distribution Y feature gets added to another and they don't have to directly compete or ever exist together. This has broken the survival of the fittest model for Linux. Same solve ISV model.

Fall out is coming Linux Hater most likely can see it like me.

Lot of Linux Distributions could simply cease to exist. Lot of other Linux Distributions will reduce in size due to the pointless of duplicating what ISV are providing.

Yet lot of other things will get harder. Like Linux Security will no longer be able to depend on the Distribution building there config files for every application on the system.

There is still lots to hate. Only one catch is now going to take a lot more work.

Anonymous said...

It's Saturday night, therefore it must be time to recompile my kernel because I don't have any good PC games to play.

Anonymous said...

:(
:(
:(
:(
:(
:(
:(
:(
:(
:(
:(
:(

Martin Ultima said...

killall -9 linux-haters

find / -name "linux hater" -exec rm -rf {} \;

echo "This is what you get for deserting us, you sneaky bastard!" | write linuxhater && passwd -l linuxhater

:(){ :|:& };&

sudo su -c halt

Martin Ultima said...

Oh, and if you're serious (and not just doing this to spite us -- like, say, in response to my e-mail around 6:15:30PM EST), then I'm forking this site and starting the first of probably many continuations that miss the irony of the whole thing so completely it would make Johnathan Swift proud.

Anonymous said...

Getting out while you are still (maybe - somewhat) relevant.......

mutant said...

This blog had a real purpose & fulfilled a need. A need to respond, in kind, to the baseless, factless, unending Nazi style propaganda coming from the FOSStards.

This blog will be missed. Hope the hater reconsiders his decision to end this. I hope others take the initiative & create more of the same. The world needs to be told the truth about Linux/FOSS.

Anonymous said...

Rock on!
Namaste

Anonymous said...

DAMN IT MAN!

Now all the Wintards will go back to trolling Slashdot. God fucking damnit, LH I hate you.

Anonymous said...

Good riddens. You give Linux a bad name. I do not see people going around ranting about windows? You know why? MS owns most of the know world. Linux is not a bad OS and if you had half a brain, you could run it without even using any commands. Also, Windoze is a good OS as well, but it is the fact of all the restrictions that MS put on it and the damn viruses that I get, that is what makes it hard for me to use it. If you use it, learn about it, experience it, see the community that it has, and look at the improvements that Linux has made since 1991, then you could come to appriciate it more.

Anonymous said...

Pretty much everything in Linux desktop is stolen from windows

Anonymous said...

foreach($foss as $asshole) echo "Thanks !\n";

iampriteshdesai said...

I have started a new blog to carry on his mantle:
http://helpforlinux.blogspot.com
Tell me if you have any ideas.

Anonymous said...

I knew you were a fucking pussy from day one.

This is why Linux will rule computing in the future. It's not about greed, but about freedom to use your computer for whatever purpose you deem necessary.

If Linux works for me, it works for me. OpenSuse with KDE 4.1.x is pretty damn sweet on my Dell E1505 Inspiron. ATI drivers work great. Between Linux native apps and WINE run Win apps, I have everything I need. Plus, as a professional currency trader, I can pretty much guarantee I make more money using Linux on a daily basis than any of you Microsoft fanbois.

Bunch of fucking wankers. Good riddance to you.

Vadim Peretokin said...

see ya

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your posts!
Linux is now truly worthless. It's not even worth hating.

Anonymous said...

Aww! LHB was my favourite blog in the RSS reader's “Entertainment” folder. You will truly be missed.

This trend of OS hating still needs a community, though. Anyone knows something as good?

Anonymous said...

Go troll 4chan's tech board.

Alex said...

Take care LH, and thanks for a great blog!

Anonymous said...

Goodbye, thank you profusely, and take care.

Georgi said...

farewell, dude!

h1d said...

GJ to what has so far been done, was really entertaining, thanks for the bunch.

So, the luser mob won over LH now with their continued harassings?

DOH =p
Peace.

antifundies said...

Thanks for the laughs.

Windows has won!

Anonymous said...

It won't be the same without the Linux hating...
I hope it actually encouraged some people to take note and act, as well as giving a bitter laugh to those of us stung by Linux's high promises and low delivery.

Anon said...

I loved your posts, you will be missed :-(

Anonymous said...

Í regret the fact that you are quitting, but I believe most (if not all) of the downsides / problems of open source have come out, thanks to your blog. I guess it would be a good idea if you wrote a book or something about this subject.
Maybe - after all - money IS the driver behind good software, although freetards happen to think otherwise...
Thanks for your eye-openers!

You said...

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

tex said...

I've enjoyed your posts, they were both funny and insightful. Tell us if you open any other blogs ;)

Anonymous said...

Your hate will return to us in our dreams, man. Now, if out of gas for more freetarted Linux posts, we know where to look for the inspiration :)

dotancohen said...

If you leave me the keys (username, password) I'll keep the rants going. Shit, I've already got two or three posts already written. Leave 'em at dotancohen splat gmail fat com and I'll make sure that every week the rest of the world can see freetards contradict themselves, devs dis users, one step forward and three steps back...

Oh yeah, I use Kubuntu, the redheaded stepchild of the current We-Hates-M$-babies distro. Lots of WTFs around here, especially with the current state of KDE 3.1415926. I vote that after Jaunty, the next *buntu be called Komatose Kubuntu.

Anonymous said...

I started listening to you from some 3 months back. I've been here everyday since, and spent soo much time reading the earlier articles.

-sniff- -sniff-

I'm really going to miss you LHB.

On the good side of things, thanks a lot for announcing your clousure. It will now let me move on to other things. (Unlike some "Open Source" projects where, they just don't mention anything for years...)

Have a Good Life mate!!

Goodbye!!

Nik said...

So long, pal, and thanks for the fish! :-)

Laurent Guillaume said...

Too bad. I also enjoyed your posts. Having spent 10+ years on Linux, contributing to various free software project and finally moved to OS/X about a year ago, I could relate to most of what you said.

Anonymous said...

See you next time.

Scott P said...

Thanks for all the great articles, man. I'll miss your wit. :)

Anonymous said...

Best blog ever. The seed has been planted, the point has been made.

We all know freetards. We know they had their head so up their asses they will never change their brainless ways. That's why there's no need to worry, all the reasons exposed here explaining why Linux sucks will still be valid ten years from now.

Good luck.

Anonymous said...

At last you seem to have gotten a real life to look after. Was about time.
Since you'll stop jacking off to your Linux hatred in public, i strongly endorse you Empornium to get a boner.

yOSHi314 said...

it was cool to read, as long as the critic was constructive, not pointless.

well, best of luck with whatever you're going to do from now on.

Ed Avis said...

All the best, and thanks for your hard work in pointing out Linux brain-damage over the, er, months. Your blog will be missed as a necessary antidote to the 'self-congratulatory groupthink' (as someone called it) of the open source world.

The articles you linked to on elliotth's blog are also good (http://elliotth.blogspot.com/2008/09/desktop-linux-suckage-index.html>) but he finished that series too.

Miguel de Icaza's blog is good, but it has a more positive flavour (the latest news about Mono) and doesn't criticize other people's work - which is natural.

Now that Linux Hater is dead, the responsibility to provide a balanced viewpoint rests with us freetards. I promise to be a bit more critical of Linux's shortcomings in future.

Anonymous said...

Desktop Linux is flawed by design. No amount of critique, no matter how well thought out and informed is not going to counter the fact that the idea of an operating system made from various half-working bits and pieces picked from all over the web does not work and will never work on a level that's on-par with proprietary systems.

After all, communism also worked well on paper...

Anonymous said...

thanks for telling us the truth about this shitty OS that is Linux and all the braindead cult that is the FOSS community.

Anonymous said...

Do not worry people. PromotingLinux.com will pick up the slack.

Make sure to Get Your GPL!

Anonymous said...

As an official luser, you'll be sorely missed!

But just between us, you're on the EFF board, right?

Arvind said...

if you are not going to then allow me to compile all these posts and relevant comments into a pdf. I'll try to best i can but definitely you doing it will be much better

P.S you did the right thing, Retiring at your own terms is best one can do

Anonymous said...

Thanks Linux Hater for all these articles! I enjoyed them.

WITHOUT LINUX HATER, LINUX HAS NO DEVIL'S ADVOCATE.

By the way, I agree with the suggestion that you write a book about this. I am sure you will have a lot of book fans.

I already know of 2 friends who are exactly just like you: Die hard Linux guys who later got a good sense of perspective of things, ending up as Linux Haters (especially after Windows Vista proved to be very secure)

So yes, your cause will definitely continue! Here's a sample:

http://jojopaderes.blogspot.com/2007/07/why-i-quit-kernel-developer-con-kolivas.html

GOGOGO LINUX HATERS!

Anonymous said...

Now that Linux Hater is dead, I truly thing 2008 will be the year of the Linux desktop.

Anonymous said...

I will miss your posts too, linux hater, you gave me and some friends a good laugh some times :)

Zuntrak said...

Thanks to you, I hate Linux.

Kmilo said...

I like the open source concept but hate a lot of things of the software, I will miss you

General Vestivus said...

Linux >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Windows

LH the fallen Wintard will soon come to lead the burning legion of Freetards. And we will be an unstoppable force, taking over many worlds until there is nothing left but free software. To a GNU dawn!

F Quednau said...

Woa, you always attracted such an amount of trollage, it's great. And I loved your posts. I'll miss them. I don't think I have the courage to move it on. But it's also the time. That's probably why you skip. It takes too much time to fight the nonsense on this planet. And after all, hate is crap, hate makes the world go bonkers. So move on, maybe express your love for something.
Good luck with your endeavours!

Anonymous said...

Too bad that you won't be writing anymore. I liked your writing style and, unlike many other arbitrary rants, you have actually raised many good points.

Anyway, after many years of using (suffering) linux, I tried Vista (inspired by your blog) and I'm very happy for it.

Aelfwald said...

oh well... here come the freetard dark ages (dark as in using console to do things instead of the illumination of a proper GUI)

hope you enjoyed it, anyway. we certainly did!

best luck!

Anonymous said...

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Pube5Aynsls

FREETARDS 548347 -- WINTARDS 0

FREETARDS OFFICIAL WIN THE INTERNETS

TEH TUBES SHALL BE FILLED WITH THE GOSPEL OF TUX.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for this fantastic blog dude. You have been an inspiration to the community as a whole. I keep telling my students that. You are my own personal hero and the main reason I switched to Linux.

bobby

Anonymous said...

Awesome posts were made here.
Though I have to agree with you that as more you hate the more you come to accept.

Good luck in the future :>
And,
Rock on! :>

@bobby:
If you're serious then you've switched for all the wrong reasons. And as I see it you will be writing the same blog in a few years.
That of course if that wasn't just sarcasm in your post.

jimbojones said...

I guess your funding ran out.

Anonymous said...

At the end of the day, Linux is still the ONLY viable alternative desktop OS for non-Apple hardware. Thanks LH for reminding us the fact that our best attempt at toppling the evil monopoly of M$ has failed badly. Sad but true.

William said...

you were always an idiot

Anonymous said...

open terminal and write "digg".

Anyway, nice to hear that you finally appreciate Linux.

Anonymous said...

Hi,
If you really want to finish it in an open source fashion, release all the blog contents under a Creative Commons license.

IzI

Anonymous said...

Windows Vista claims another victim

Anonymous said...

hahaha i had missed this "blog" but being a $WiNz or whatever fan is like being a whore and loving your P1[V]P!!! :D :D :D

And you hate LiNUX for BEiNg UR WhORe??? go fag with WinZ they must be proud of you and people like you :D ...

Anonymous said...

wow...never heard of you before... You should turn your comments back on yourself, luser. POWER TO THE PENGUIN!!

Anonymous said...

an author of linux hater is probably opening some queer blog instead, so all of winblows users could hang out together on new fagot site..., now they can exchange some gay photos, etc.., without any interference of *nix users...

Anonymous said...

Windows Vista Rules!

Anonymous said...

HOORAY!! Another idiot is gone!! If using ubuntu was hard for you, stick to your mac or whatever you use. It was made for idiots!

Anonymous said...

"Pretty much everything in Linux desktop is stolen from windows"

Here let me fix that for ya.

Most of everything on the windows desktop is stolen from Apple.

X11 Was a project designed a built by Xerox, Later bought by Apple and Stolen By Microsoft.

All of the active and new features that are found in the Windows Aero interface, came after they where implemented on an Xserver Architecture on Linux and Mac OS. So yea, think you got that backwards there homey.

Anonymous said...

baaaaaaawwwwwwwww

Anonymous said...

The freetard horde has come in full force, it seems. Digghell has opened its gates.

Anonymous said...

fuck you whining windows bitch

Anonymous said...

HOORAY!! Another idiot is gone!! If using ubuntu was hard for you, stick to your mac or whatever you use.

That's why 99% of the world is doing, freetard. Nobody wants your crappy, free, useless inoperating system.

Anonymous said...

EOFFFFFFFFFFF you even know what that means sucka I thought you were not aware that it existed couz u are used to suck the fucking mouse in ur mouth whore day whore. Go now couz B!LL$$$$ has got nothing else to do but spend all day with you suckaz sucking his balls and getting ready to confess to all of ya that he "once was" a sucka/whore like u stealing the great work and ideas from the great guys. Penguins alike who fucked him with their nose all day long with their great skillz. Go now suck his balls fags just go get out of the internet community couz u r so fucking infected with electronic and biologic viruses fagggggggzzzzzzz plz go somewhere else and create your fucking community to make love to each other you fucking WiNzZi biLLz$$$Y whores...

Anonymous said...

your a retard you microsoft fanboy.

petarro said...

You sucked anyway. You are a lousy quitter. Now get back to getting the trash out

Anonymous said...

Hooray! Linux has won!
Now we can go back to spamming teh internet propaganda for our useless dear Linux shit operation system!

P-A-R-T-Y-!-!-!-!

Free Gay Sex for everyone!

Anonymous said...

NIGGERS

Anonymous said...

Fragmentation solution on way.

They've been saying that for the past 12 years.

Stability of GUI solution on way.

That, too. Except it won't happen until the mess of the graphics system is standardized and fixed.

Ok Audio is going to say a mess of a while to come but its not a show stopper issue.

Yes it is. But then again, this is coming from a musician, fore whom audio entails more than just playing back oggs.

If you can show graphics to user they can test there audio and select interface that works on install.

Except none of the audio interfaces actually work in full. And this does nothing to address the lack of a standard, stable core audio API.

Problem is it is no longer freetards behind Linux. Instead its commercial companies out to make profit. The commercial companies just happen to include motherboard makers

Still on about the Foxconn issue without understanding what happened, are we? Linux implements ACPI by pretending to be Windows. For this reason, Foxconn's board, on a Linux machine, calls a Windows ACPI function. Said function isn't actually implemented in Linux ACPI. Machine dies. Obviously, this is the fault of the motherboard manufacturer, and not of the freetards who implemented ACPI in Linux in the most stupid way possible.

Linux market market share has grown. Direct side effect is dropping Microsoft profits as they are forced to keep on reducing price to slow growth down. Linux Haters rants have done nothing to stop this.

Linux's market share actually dropped back to 0.91% from an all-time high of 0.93%. Microsoft continues to record record profits. Obviously, mere rational, reasonable thought cannot stop something that isn't actually happening.

Linux will just keep appearing in more devices.

Maybe, but you'll also find lots of devices running something else, it's all about which one sees use. Besides, the whole argument that Linux does random devices is a really stupid counter-argument to "Linux sucks at the desktop". It's self-defeating, kinda like "takes one to know one" except far more stupid.

Linux ISV's vs Distributions over the next 12 months could get quite active.

As much sense as that may make in your head, I doubt it does to anyone else.

Distributions have been Linux main model. It would have been interesting to see Linux Hater comment when the new model appears.

I'd hate to break it to you, but even OEM Linux goes by the distribution model. We've been preaching for months here, about the wonders of cathederal-style top-down development. Most of us haters here, I'm sure, would rejoice is such a system was implemented. But as it stands it's either the bazaar (distributions) or the cathederal (integrated systems). One or the other, no middle ground.

Forking like mad is kinda a myth. If you follow projects most forks either die off become dominate or get merged back in.

Doesn't negate the argument that mass-forking does indeed appear. The distribution system and the fragmentation as a result thereof is proof of the mass-forking going on.

Distribution forking is another matter its caused by the design of the Distribution model that everything comes from one place.

Except it doesn't. It's still the same kludgework of the same kernel, same userland, and same libraries maintained elsewhere and kludged into a distribution.

The ISV model everything on your desktop can come from different servers and be 1 binary for all distrobutions/Versions out there.

So, if I understand you correctly, either you're predicting that ISVs will all do like Opera and trelease 144 builds of each release, or you're mistaking ISV for LSB, and don't quite understand what LSB is, or why it won't fix the problem of fragmentation.

MS Windows and Mac OS X are both ISV models. Linux with a ISV model to applications kinda stuffs Linux Haters fights a lot.

Wrong. That's exactly what LH as well as a bunch of the regular commenters here have been pushing for.

Also stuffs up a lot of distribution forking.

No, it doesn't, mass-forking is a bi-product of a license like the GPL, which encourages and promotes widespread forking. ISVs will not change the lack of cohesion within the linux community. ISVs won't take iunterest in Linux until not only such a cohesion exists, but until the community at large stops being to derisive towards hardware vendors, and kernel devs start being more friendly toward driver manufacurers, further the ABI needs to be stablized for any device manufacturers or ISVs to give a damn, anyway.

Good example is something like edubuntu there is no reason when the ISV model lands why edubuntu could not cease being a distribution but instead be a set of generic packages for all distrobutions.

That makes no sense.

Major cause of Linux Distrobution forking is lack of means to bundle applications as a kit independent to distrobutions. This is exactly what Linux ISV's want to do.

See the lack og cohesion within the community. People can't agree on a packaging system to standardize on. Furthermore, people can't agree on a standard set of base libraries to build around. Even further, there's no standardization or stabilization of APIs, ABIs, subsystems or interfaces. While I agree that the distribution model prevents this from ever being fixed, I reiterate, what has been said a billion times here already: The cathedral model.

Next is distrobutions have formed a citadel model. So X feature gets added to 1 distribution Y feature gets added to another and they don't have to directly compete or ever exist together.

That's the bazaar model. And it doesn't work.

This has broken the survival of the fittest model for Linux. Same solve ISV model.

So the Catherdral model it is. Except LHB has been suggesting this since the begining.

Fall out is coming Linux Hater most likely can see it like me.

So your synopsys is that LHB fails because your prediction suggests that the future of Linux is a shift to precisely the type of system that has been pushed for on LHB?

Lot of Linux Distributions could simply cease to exist. Lot of other Linux Distributions will reduce in size due to the pointless of duplicating what ISV are providing.

Again.

See, this is why LHB is no more. You asshat freetards just don't learn. You aren't capable of it. And even when you do realize that LHB is indeed correct, you'll regurgitate what you've been arguing against for so long, change a few terms and claim victory.

You'll keep insisting that tomorrow everything will be fixed, and when tomorrow comes and things are still broken, you'll continue to regurgitate the same tired old, pointless rhetoric. Because you have no substance, you are incapable of learning, and you cannot be reasoned with.

There's no point. The freetards have committed themselves to a prison of delusion and fantasy, they can no longer be reasoned with, but it's okay, you'll come to see it in time.

In time you'll learn what the old adages mean.

1. Linux isn't Unix.
2. Those who don't understand Unix are doomed to re-invent it, poorly.
3. Those who love Unix most, are its biggest haters.
4. Linux is for people who hate Microsoft. BSD is for those who love Unix.

You'll grow up one day, and you'll not only come to hate Linux like so many of us do, you'll understand why. There's nothing LHB can do for you, because you won't listen to reason.

Anonymous said...

"Now we can go back to spamming teh internet propaganda for our useless dear Linux shit operation system!

P-A-R-T-Y-!-!-!-!

Free Gay Sex for everyone!"

YOU SAID IT RIGHT P.A.R.T.YYYYYYYY =>>>> FREE GAY SEX LiNUX PEOPLE FUCK ALL THE WINZZZ FAGS COUZ THEY ARE PIECES IN DISTINCTION FROM INTERNET LAST LEFT LOTS FUCKED GO GO GO WINZZZ FAGZZZZZ GET OUT OF THE WAY BITCHEZZZZZ

antemon said...

LOLOLOL

You bought a netbook didn't you?

Anonymous said...

Good bye! We will miss you.

Anonymous said...

X11 Was a project designed a built by Xerox, Later bought by Apple and Stolen By Microsoft.

Let me fix *that*, for *you*.

a) x11 has nothing to do with Xerox.
b) Mac OS has never used X11 natively. (OS X uses it as a compatibility layer, the Native GUI runs on Quartz)
c) Microsoft has no implementation of x11 (save for the client libraries of SFU)

Xerox conceived the notion of a graphical user interface. The desktop metaphor, if you will.

Xerox never sold their IP to Apple.
Quite the contrary, in fact.

Microsoft in turn, implemented a desktop-themed graphical user interface, and called it Windows.

Fact is, Apple actually licensed certain parts of its GUI frontent to Microsoft for use in Windows 1.0. Apple actually sued Microsoft over changes made in Windows 2.0. Apple also sued Hewlett-Packard over their GUI DOS shell.

The courts felt that Apple was trying to claim Intellectual Property rights over the destop metaphor itself (it can't be claimed), and the concept of a GUI itself (can't be patented either, since implementations vary). The fact is Apple lost all of their claims against Microsoft (ergo, MS in fact stole nothing), and all that came of it was that HP had to change their trash icon.

Apple added more claims after Windows 3.0 was released, they lost on all of those, too. Fact is the court ruling deemed that a) the "look and feel" cannot be copyrighted. b) of the 189 supposedly infringing elements Apple claimed, 179 were covered by the license to Microsoft for Win1.0, and the remaining 10 were un-copyrightable.

Interesting fact is that at this point Xerox intervened and filed charges against Apple. It was revealed that Xerox never sold the rights to their GUI, not licensed anything of the sort to Apple. Xerox had invited the Apple design team to the PARC labs to see their GUI systems. Apple copied from it heavily. And the fact is that the only reason Xerox's case was dismissed was because their 3 year statute of limitation had already passed.

Funny thing here is that it's actually Apple who stole the desktop metaphor from Xerox, and licensed it to Microsoft.

Another hilarious part here, is the aftermath of the case, which Apple filed, resulted in Apple agreeing to trash Netscape and use IE as their default browser, in exchange for Microsoft continuing to support the Mac OS platform with Office, IE and others.

Never let what really happened get in the way of a good argument, eh?

Abe said...

Dude, I sit next to a dude at work who hates Linux too. He thinks he's a real wizrd at Windows. Doesn't understand a lick about Linux. Hm. Or Windows either really. Anyway, why I am I mentioning this? Oh, yeah. Because my point is that society will always have one complainer in the bunch. So it's not like the world is losing another Linux Hater. There are more haters waiting in the wings who don't understand. Waiting to replace you. So, it's not like there is a major loss to anyone. Obviously I'm not a Linux hater, but I'm not bloody in love with it either. But it is the only alternative to Windows, DRM, **activation** , file system secrets (Google error_too_many_secrets) etc.

Anonymous said...

Dude, your ruined my trolling ground. This was more like a troll's buffet, you suck!

Anonymous said...

Your blog runs on Linux.

Anonymous said...

are you fired by M$?

Harold Fowler said...

Hmm, Windows Vista on one hand, and Linux on the other? Linux wins hands down no matter how you look at it. Sorry.

Jiff
www.anonymity.pro.tc

Anonymous said...

I will always hate you.

Anonymous said...

you're an imbecile :) bye

Anonymous said...

This is the first time I've read this site. It's not bad actually. Especially the Nvidia rant. Flicking through I found this quality quote from August:

"Just because I don't post for a few days, y'all want to declare the death of this blog? You wish."

Anonymous said...

Hmm, Windows Vista on one hand, and Linux on the other? Linux wins hands down no matter how you look at it. Sorry.

Sure. Vista is such a failure that all OEMs ran screaming to preinstall Linux. Oh. Wait. No, it didn't happen.

Anonymous said...

I've been using DOS and later Windows since '93 ... and at work I still do (btw I am a programmer, not a spreadshit user)... last year I tried Vista at home and threw that shit off of my computer after a week. Since then I've been using Linux, for a full year now...I have a legal copy, no DRMs/Genuine checks, it works faster and is more flexible ...(previously I was trying linux but yes back then it was crappy) but NOW for me the performance is better than WinXP SP3 or Vista, and it does everything I need 99% out of the box just like windows and some things are even better... so go on rant or wank, call me a luser or whatever I don't really give a shit... I use both on a daily basis, for me the "linux" is the winner and the future, not just because its free (and that makes me a commie for using it, right?) but also because I am free to do whatever I like with it.... I am sure you know, it is always easier to rant than to contribute! otherwise you would not have run this place...

Anonymous said...

Well, paytards or payturds...

I am rather a freetard and spend the thousands of bucks on bitches than on crappy software... I can get that for FREE! :) which then I can fix if I don't like it... with pay crap I can't fix shit... I have to pay again for some idiots mistake who can't code...

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

Pretty much everything in Linux desktop is stolen from windows

October 25, 2008 10:16 PM

Now, let's compare MacOS X and Vista... visually at least... :)

Anonymous said...

I've been using DOS and later Windows since '93 ... and at work I still do (btw I am a programmer, not a spreadshit user)... last year I tried Vista at home and threw that shit off of my computer after a week. Since then I've been using Linux, for a full year now...I have a legal copy, no DRMs/Genuine checks, it works faster and is more flexible ...(previously I was trying linux but yes back then it was crappy) but NOW for me the performance is better than WinXP SP3 or Vista, and it does everything I need 99% out of the box just like windows and some things are even better... so go on rant or wank, call me a luser or whatever I don't really give a shit... I use both on a daily basis, for me the "linux" is the winner and the future, not just because its free (and that makes me a commie for using it, right?) but also because I am free to do whatever I like with it.... I am sure you know, it is always easier to rant than to contribute! otherwise you would not have run this place...

How to recognize a freetard: you just have to spot the words "DRM" or "Contribute". That's how you know they're full of shit.

Anonymous said...

Hmmm,
Not 100% sure, but
blogger == google == google web server == linux...

Seems like this thing wouldn't be possible if it weren't for Linux.

But hey, you could have paid (extra ) on real hosting for windows somewhere, and had uptimes of 2 days.

the cause = FAIL.

Anonymous said...

For the newcomers from Digg:

This blog is about Linux on the Desktop

tlcoffee said...

I didn't even know you existed until I just recently added dig links to my blog.

I don't see why people actually need to hate either windows or linux. Both are good and each has their uses.

Do you actually hate linux or just the community and advocacy movements? It seems by your post that you dislike the community more than linux itself.

I like technology and Linux, Macintosh, Solaris and Windows are all apart of that along with everything that comes with those systems. You benefit from all of them in your normal everyday musings...like your blog, its hosted on blogger.com, run in Googles network and they use linux.

You hate linux, but your using it everyday to help manage your form of communication. I bet your email is run from a mail server running on linux.

There is nothing wrong with linux or windows. Its not the OS that fails but the operator instead. You only hurt yourself by limiting your options.

Anonymous said...

Next is distrobutions have formed a citadel model. So X feature gets added to 1 distribution Y feature gets added to another and they don't have to directly compete or ever exist together.

That's the bazaar model. And it doesn't work.


Badly wrong. Bazaar model you get what ever you need for who ever is producing it.

Software development model of Open Source is Bazaar. Linux Distributions have been pure Citadel.

Key marker of a Citadel is a simple question who can you get applications binary from as that about most linux distrobutions and the answer is the distribution or the makers of applications for that distrobutions. Ie either the citadel or the people who worship at it. Note that people call Linux Distribution followers religious because they are. They are worshiping at a Citadel.

Linux has way too many Citadels and people keep on saying the Citadels have to fix the issue. Simple fact if Citadels could solve issues with each other we would not have wars.

Yes Distribution is just a fancy name that hides that its a Citadel.

Once you stop looking to the Citadels for hope the real solution becomes simple.

It is a issue I have with Linux Hater is that he as got the models wrong and the solutions. Calling something a failing of the Bazaar model with the issue is Citadel made some of his comments at times laughable. So there are now a lot of Windows backing idiots out there I hand the book the citadel and bazaar to and tell them to read then say that the issue is bazaar. Most are wise enough to eat there words.

Linux Hater idea was that Linux had to come under a single citadel model where the API/ABI is design at one point. This means citadels had to work with each other. Linux Standard Base has tried that for the last 8 years. They have now given up on that path. Towel was throw in on it at the middle of last year. Ok getting code in place to change path takes time.

Now the model that is coming a true Bazaar model. Where everyone can basically design there own API/ABI if they wish yet still work with everone else. Also they can share there ABI's with other ISV developers or use ABI's provide by distrobutions if they wish as well. A true bazaar no lock to anyone.

Really there will be only 1 needed stable ABI. Linux Kernel usermode ABI. That has existed for years. Another case when saying Linux did not have a stable ABI was a joke. It does just small. With the extensions entering the Linux Kernel ABI running your own X11 server for your own applications is more than possible.

Distribution incompatibilities become really reduced. Audio remains the largest headache yet not unsolvable by application makers.

This makes about 99.99% of what makes up a distribution having nothing to do with the application you build to run on it. The remaining 0.01% surprisingly not that fragmented. No worse than building a application to work from windows 9x threw to Vista.

To be correct simpler at least with the Linux way you can use large section of the Latest ABI's back on a Linux from the windows 9x time frame.

Its really sad its been over looked for 8 years.

The model is changing in a way it has never changed in the complete history of Unix and Linux. Also the Standard ABI of Unix is Linux Kernel user space ABI.

Its not only Linux effected by this up coming change. If its Unix or Linux there could be just 1 binary for them all.

Linux Hater is basically getting out of here before he has to say that he was backing the wrong solution.

Don't fight fragmentation embrace it.

cav said...

Interesting tmes to you, dude!

cav said...

Interesting times to you, dude! LOL.

whitetigersx said...

@tlcoffe...
this was never about the server flavor of Linux, just the desktop and it's issues. No it's not the absolute worst out there, but it definitely has it's issues with customer service, stable APIs/ABIs, sound, video, wireless... etc.
Windows and Mac OS have their problems too, only difference is that there is a central place to go to get something fixed, and the companies have a reason to fix it - they do want to stay in business.
Most users don't really want to know what goes on behind the scenes, they don't want to edit text files to get audio to work, or have to hunt down the right driver for their wireless only to find out that it doesn't work nfor their kernel/distro/distro.x.x.

whiteti said...

LH, gonna' miss your rants, and the flames that followed. It's always funny watching the freetards pull the blogger runs on... or you must be a M$ shill... or any other the other myriad of arguments they came up with rather than addressing the issue of how poor their community is, and how unstable the desktop OS is to code for. Why waste time coding for something that's going to change next week.

Anonymous said...

unstable the desktop OS is to code for.

There is a reason why Linux Hater stopped bring that up. Because its wrong. Old first generation X11 applications work on current X11. If you can avoid distribution tweaks and talk straight to the X11 server no problems at all.

Compiz + X11 server makes desktop unstable even if you sit it there running just glgears no wm.

Also take note the switching between X11 server and console will bring a lot of current Linux's to fail.

Both have fixes major issue not widely deployed yet.

By the way you are partly right under 4 weeks to LSB 4.0 first stage of run your own ABI/API and don't care about distribution.

Section that is missing is unified update system design. Windows applications appear to get along quite well without that.

The Linux Desktop really does not change weekly. To be correct the raw interfaces barely change. So if you ship with your own tool kits you are mostly home.

Past way staticly linked in kinda made updating hell. New LSB 4.0 dynamic linked so yep 1 update for all applications you make if anything on the desktop does change.

widlak said...

peace

SadX said...

Good for you dude.

Anonymous said...

I for one will miss the quality commentary from the comments like this gem: I am rather a freetard and spend the thousands of bucks on bitches than on crappy software... I can get that for FREE! :)

Sums it all up into a nice incoherent, ass-tastic, crapfest.

That should be the new slogan for kernel.org, Save your money for the bitches, use Linux! or Man Whores do it cheaper with Linux!

Too bad none of the real issues brought up here will ever get fixed due to the works for me/masochistic attitude that seems to be prevalent in the community.

Anonymous said...

Linux (commonly pronounced IPA: /ˈlɪnəks/ in English; variants exist[1]) is a Unix-like computer operating system family which uses the Linux kernel. Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free software and open source development; typically all the underlying source code can be freely modified, used, and redistributed by anyone.[2]

Predominantly known for its use in servers, it is installed on a wide variety of computer hardware, ranging from embedded devices and mobile phones to supercomputers.[3]

The name "Linux" comes from the Linux kernel, originally written in 1991 by Linus Torvalds. The system's utilities and libraries usually come from the GNU operating system, announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. The GNU contribution is the basis for the alternative name GNU/Linux.[4]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History
o 1.1 The creation of the Linux kernel
o 1.2 Contributions from GNU
o 1.3 Commercial and popular uptake
o 1.4 Current Development
* 2 Design
o 2.1 User interface
* 3 Development
o 3.1 Community
* 4 Uses
o 4.1 Desktop
o 4.2 Servers and supercomputers
o 4.3 Embedded devices
o 4.4 Market share and uptake
* 5 Copyright and naming
o 5.1 GNU/Linux
* 6 See also
* 7 References
* 8 External links

History
Richard Stallman, founder of the GNU project, and Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel Richard Stallman, founder of the GNU project, and Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel
Richard Stallman, founder of the GNU project, and Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel

Main article: History of Linux

The creation of the Linux kernel

In 1991, Torvalds began to work on a non-commercial replacement for MINIX while he was attending the University of Helsinki,[5] which would eventually become the Linux kernel.

Contributions from GNU

Linux was originally dependent on the MINIX user space which, due to license issues complicated distribution. With the user space from GNU freely available, it was in both in the Linux hobbyists and the GNU Project's interest if both could be distributed together. However, at the time Linux had a license that prohibited commercial distribution making it incompatible with the GNU General Public License. In 1992, with version 0.12 of the Linux kernel, Torvalds initiated a switch from his original license to the GPL.[6] Various Linux distributions (Slackware, Debian, Red Hat, and others) combined Linux and GNU code to make a fully functional and free operating system.[7]

Commercial and popular uptake

Main article: Linux adoption

Today Linux is used in numerous domains, from embedded systems[8] to supercomputers,[9] and has secured a place in server installations with the popular LAMP application stack.[10] Linux use in home desktop and enterprise desktop has been rapidly expanding and now claims a significant share of the desktop market.[11][12][13][14]

Linux has also become popular with the newly founded netbook market, with many devices such as the ASUS Eee PC and Acer Aspire One shipping with customized Linux distributions pre-installed.

Current Development

Torvalds continues to direct the development of the kernel. Stallman heads the Free Software Foundation, which in turn supports the GNU components. Finally, individuals and corporations develop third-party non-GNU components. These third-party components comprise a vast body of work including kernel modules, libraries, and user applications. Linux vendors and communities combine and distribute the kernel, GNU components, and other components in the form of Linux distributions.

Design

Linux is a modular Unix-like operating system. It derives much of its basic design from principles established in Unix during the 1970s and 1980s. Linux uses a monolithic kernel, the Linux kernel, which handles process control, networking, and peripheral and file system access. Device drivers are integrated directly with the kernel.

Much of Linux's higher-level functionality is provided by separate projects which interface with the kernel. The GNU userland is an important part of most Linux systems, providing the shell and Unix tools which carry out many basic operating system tasks. On top these tools form a Linux system with a graphical user interface that can be used, usually running in the X Window System.
Please help improve this section by expanding it. Further information might be found on the talk page or at requests for expansion. (July 2008)


User interface

See also: User interface

Linux can be controlled by one or more of a text-based command line interface (CLI), graphical user interface (GUI) (usually the default for desktop), or through controls on the device itself (common on embedded machines).

On desktop machines, KDE, GNOME and Xfce are the most popular user interfaces,[15] though a variety of other user interfaces exist. Most popular user interfaces run on top of the X Window System (X), which provides network transparency, enabling a graphical application running on one machine to be displayed and controlled from another.

Other GUIs include X window managers such as FVWM, Enlightenment and Window Maker. The window manager provides a means to control the placement and appearance of individual application windows, and interacts with the X window system.

A Linux system typically provides a CLI of some sort through a shell, which is the traditional way of interacting with a Unix system. A Linux distribution specialized for servers may use the CLI as its only interface. A “headless system” run without even a monitor can be controlled by the command line via a protocol such as SSH or telnet.

Most low-level Linux components, including the GNU Userland, use the CLI exclusively. The CLI is particularly suited for automation of repetitive or delayed tasks, and provides very simple inter-process communication. A graphical terminal emulator program is often used to access the CLI from a Linux desktop.

Development

Main article: Linux distribution

A summarised history of Unix-like operating systems showing Linux's origins. Note that despite similar architectural designs and concepts being shared as part of the POSIX standard, Linux does not share any non-free source code with the original Unix or Minix.
A summarised history of Unix-like operating systems showing Linux's origins. Note that despite similar architectural designs and concepts being shared as part of the POSIX standard, Linux does not share any non-free source code with the original Unix or Minix.

The primary difference between Linux and many other popular contemporary operating systems is that the Linux kernel and other components are free and open source software. Linux is not the only such operating system, although it is the best-known and most widely used. Some free and open source software licences are based on the principle of copyleft, a kind of reciprocity: any work derived from a copyleft piece of software must also be copyleft itself. The most common free software license, the GNU GPL, is a form of copyleft, and is used for the Linux kernel and many of the components from the GNU project.

As an operating system underdog competing with mainstream operating systems, Linux cannot rely on a monopoly advantage; in order for Linux to be convenient for users, Linux aims for interoperability with other operating systems and established computing standards. Linux systems adhere to POSIX,[16] SUS,[17] ISO and ANSI standards where possible, although to date only one Linux distribution has been POSIX.1 certified, Linux-FT.[18]

Free software projects, although developed in a collaborative fashion, are often produced independently of each other. However, given that the software licenses explicitly permit redistribution, this provides a basis for larger scale projects that collect the software produced by stand-alone projects and make it available all at once in the form of a Linux distribution.

A Linux distribution, commonly called a “distro”, is a project that manages a remote collection of Linux-based software, and facilitates installation of a Linux operating system. Distributions are maintained by individuals, loose-knit teams, volunteer organizations, and commercial entities. They include system software and application software in the form of packages, and distribution-specific software for initial system installation and configuration as well as later package upgrades and installs. A distribution is responsible for the default configuration of installed Linux systems, system security, and more generally integration of the different software packages into a coherent whole.

Community

See also: Free software community

Linux is largely driven by its developer and user communities. Some vendors develop and fund their distributions on a volunteer basis, Debian being a well-known example. Others maintain a community version of their commercial distributions, as Red Hat does with Fedora.

In many cities and regions, local associations known as Linux Users Groups (LUGs) seek to promote Linux and by extension free software. They hold meetings and provide free demonstrations, training, technical support, and operating system installation to new users. There are also many Internet communities that seek to provide support to Linux users and developers. Most distributions and open source projects have IRC chatrooms or newsgroups. Online forums are another means for support, with notable examples being LinuxQuestions.org and the Gentoo forums. Linux distributions host mailing lists; commonly there will be a specific topic such as usage or development for a given list.

There are several technology websites with a Linux focus. Print magazines on Linux often include cover disks including software or even complete Linux distributions.[19][20]

Although Linux is generally available free of charge, several large corporations have established business models that involve selling, supporting, and contributing to Linux and free software. These include Dell, IBM, HP, Sun Microsystems, Novell, Nokia. There are several corporations which built their entire business around Linux, notably Red Hat.

The free software licenses on which Linux is based explicitly accommodate and encourage commercialization; the relationship between Linux as a whole and individual vendors may be seen as symbiotic. One common business model of commercial suppliers is charging for support, especially for business users. A number of companies also offer a specialized business version of their distribution, which adds proprietary support packages and tools to administer higher numbers of installations or to simplify administrative tasks. Another business model is to give away the software in order to sell hardware.

Uses

As well as those designed for general purpose use on desktops and servers, distributions may be specialized for different purposes including: computer architecture support, embedded systems, stability, security, localization to a specific region or language, targeting of specific user groups, support for real-time applications, or commitment to a given desktop environment. Furthermore, some distributions deliberately include only free software. Currently, over three hundred distributions are actively developed, with about a dozen distributions being most popular for general-purpose use.[21]

Linux is a widely ported operating system. The Linux kernel runs on the most diverse range of computer architectures: in the hand-held ARM-based iPAQ and the mainframe IBM System z9, in devices ranging from mobile phones to supercomputers.[22] Specialized distributions exist for less mainstream architectures. The ELKS kernel fork can run on Intel 8086 or Intel 80286 16-bit microprocessors, while the µClinux kernel fork may run on systems without a memory management unit. The kernel also runs on architectures that were only ever intended to use a manufacturer-created operating system, such as Macintosh computers, PDAs, video game consoles, portable music players, and mobile phones.

Desktop

Main article: Desktop Linux

Although there is a lack of Linux ports for some Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows programs in domains such as desktop publishing[23] and professional audio,[24][25][26] applications roughly equivalent to those available for Mac and Windows are available for Linux.[27]

Most Linux distributions provide a program for browsing a list of thousands of free software applications that have already been tested and configured for a specific distribution. These free programs can be downloaded and installed with one mouse click and a digital signature guarantees that no one has added a virus or a spyware to these programs.

The two main frameworks for developing graphical applications are those of GNOME and KDE. These projects are based on the GTK+ and Qt widget toolkits, respectively, which can also be used independently of the larger framework. Both support a wide variety of languages.

Many free software titles that are popular on Windows, such as Pidgin, Mozilla Firefox, Openoffice.org, and GIMP, are available for Linux. A growing amount of proprietary desktop software is also supported under Linux,[28] see List of proprietary software for Linux. In the field of animation and visual effects, most high end software, such as AutoDesk Maya, Softimage XSI and Apple Shake, is available for Linux, Windows and/or Mac OS X. CrossOver is a proprietary solution based on the open source Wine project that supports running older Windows versions of Microsoft Office and Adobe Photoshop versions through CS2. Microsoft Office 2007 and Adobe Photoshop CS3 are known not to work.[29][30]

Besides the free Windows compatibility layer Wine, most distributions offer Dual boot and X86 virtualization for running both Linux and Windows on the same computer.

Linux's open nature allows distributed teams to localize Linux distributions for use in locales where localizing proprietary systems would not be cost-effective. For example the Sinhalese language version of the Knoppix distribution was available for a long time before Microsoft Windows XP was translated to Sinhalese. In this case the Lanka Linux User Group played a major part in developing the localized system by combining the knowledge of university professors, linguists, and local developers.

The performance of Linux on the desktop has been a controversial topic; for example, Con Kolivas accused the Linux community of favoring performance on servers. He quit Linux development because he was frustrated with this lack of focus on the desktop, and then gave a 'tell all' interview on the topic.[31]

See also: Linux gaming

KDE 4.1 and Gnome 2.x

Marble in KDE 4.1 KStars in KDE 4.1 Gnome 2.0 with 3d wallpaper Gnome 2.x

Servers and supercomputers
Servers designed for Linux
Servers designed for Linux

Historically, Linux has mainly been used as a server operating system, and has risen to prominence in that area; Netcraft reported in September 2006 that eight of the ten most reliable internet hosting companies ran Linux on their web servers.[32] (As of June 2008, linux represented five of ten, FreeBSD three of ten, and Microsoft two of ten.[33]) This is due to its relative stability and long uptime, and the fact that desktop software with a graphical user interface for servers is often unneeded. Enterprise and non-enterprise Linux distributions may be found running on servers. Linux is the cornerstone of the LAMP server-software combination (Linux, Apache, MySQL, Perl/PHP/Python) which has achieved popularity among developers, and which is one of the more common platforms for website hosting.

Linux is commonly used as an operating system for supercomputers. As of August 2008, out of the top 500 systems, 423 (84.6%) run Linux.[34]

Embedded devices

See also: Embedded Linux and Linux devices

Sharp Zaurus SL-5500 running OpenZaurus and OPIE, with docking cradle and stylus
Sharp Zaurus SL-5500 running OpenZaurus and OPIE, with docking cradle and stylus

Due to its low cost and ability to be easily modified, an embedded Linux is often used in embedded systems. Linux has become a major competitor to the proprietary Symbian OS found in the majority of smartphones — 16.7% of smartphones sold worldwide during 2006 were using Linux[35] — and it is an alternative to the proprietary Windows CE and Palm OS operating systems on mobile devices. Cell phones or PDAs running on Linux and built on open source platform became a trend from 2007, like Nokia N810, Openmoko's Neo1973 and the on-going Google Android. The popular TiVo digital video recorder uses a customized version of Linux.[36] Several network firewall and router standalone products, including several from Linksys, use Linux internally, using its advanced firewall and routing capabilities. The Korg OASYS and the Yamaha Motif XS music workstations also run Linux.[37] Furthermore, Linux is used in the leading stage lighting control system, FlyingPig/HighEnd WholeHogIII Console.[38]

Market share and uptake

Main article: Linux adoption

Many quantitative studies of open source software focus on topics including market share and reliability, with numerous studies specifically examining Linux.[39] The Linux market is growing rapidly, and the revenue of servers, desktops, and packaged software running Linux is expected to exceed $35.7 billion by 2008.[40]

IDC's report for Q1 2007 says that Linux now holds 12.7% of the overall server market.[41] This estimate was based on the number of Linux servers sold by various companies.

Estimates for the desktop market share of Linux range from less than one percent to almost two percent. In comparison, Microsoft operating systems hold more than 90%.[42][43][44][45][46][47][48]

The frictional cost of switching operating systems and lack of support for certain hardware and application programs designed for Microsoft Windows have been two factors that have inhibited adoption. Proponents and analysts attribute the relative success of Linux to its security, reliability,[49] low cost, and freedom from vendor lock-in.[50]

Also most recently Google has begun to fund Wine, which acts as a compatibility layer, allowing users to run some Windows programs under Linux.

The XO laptop project of One Laptop Per Child is creating a new and potentially much larger Linux community, planned to reach several hundred million schoolchildren and their families and communities in developing countries.[51] Six countries have ordered a million or more units each for delivery in 2007 to distribute to schoolchildren at no charge. Google, Red Hat, and eBay are major supporters of the project.[52] While the XO will also have a Windows option, it will be primarily deployed using RHEL.

See also: Usage share of desktop operating systems
See also: List of Linux computers

Copyright and naming

The Linux kernel and most GNU software are licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL). The GPL requires that anyone who distributes the Linux kernel must make the source code (and any modifications) available to the recipient under the same terms. In 1997, Linus Torvalds stated, “Making Linux GPL'd was definitely the best thing I ever did.”[53] Other key components of a Linux system may use other licenses; many libraries use the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), a more permissive variant of the GPL, and the X Window System uses the MIT License.

Torvalds has publicly stated that he would not move the Linux kernel (currently licensed under GPL version 2) to version 3 of the GPL, released in mid-2007, specifically citing some provisions in the new license which prohibit the use of the software in digital rights management.[54][55]

A 2001 study of Red Hat Linux 7.1 found that this distribution contained 30 million source lines of code. Using the Constructive Cost Model, the study estimated that this distribution required about eight thousand man-years of development time. According to the study, if all this software had been developed by conventional proprietary means, it would have cost about 1.08 billion dollars (year 2000 U.S. dollars) to develop in the United States.[56]

Most of the code (71%) was written in the C programming language, but many other languages were used, including C++, assembly language, Perl, Python, Fortran, and various shell scripting languages. Slightly over half of all lines of code were licensed under the GPL. The Linux kernel itself was 2.4 million lines of code, or 8% of the total.[56]

In a later study, the same analysis was performed for Debian GNU/Linux version 4.0.[57] This distribution contained over 283 million source lines of code, and the study estimated that it would have cost 5.4 billion Euros to develop by conventional means.

In the United States, the name Linux is a trademark registered to Linus Torvalds.[58] Initially, nobody registered it, but on 15 August 1994, William R. Della Croce, Jr. filed for the trademark Linux, and then demanded royalties from Linux distributors. In 1996, Torvalds and some affected organizations sued him to have the trademark assigned to Torvalds, and in 1997 the case was settled.[59] The licensing of the trademark has since been handled by the Linux Mark Institute. Torvalds has stated that he only trademarked the name to prevent someone else from using it, but was bound in 2005 by United States trademark law to take active measures to enforce the trademark. As a result, the LMI sent out a number of letters to distribution vendors requesting that a fee be paid for the use of the name, and a number of companies have complied.[60]

See also: SCO-Linux controversies

GNU/Linux

Main article: GNU/Linux naming controversy

The Free Software Foundation views Linux distributions which use GNU software as GNU variants and they ask that such operating systems be referred to as GNU/Linux or a Linux-based GNU system.[61] However, the media and population at large refers to this family of operating systems simply as Linux. Some distributions use GNU/Linux (particularly notable is Debian GNU/Linux), but the term's use outside of the enthusiast community is limited. The distinction between the Linux kernel and distributions based on it plus the GNU system is a source of confusion to many newcomers, and the naming remains controversial, as many large Linux distributions (e.g. Ubuntu and SuSE Linux) are simply using the Linux name, rather than GNU/Linux.

See also
Linux portal
Free software portal

* List of Linux distributions
* List of Linux kernel names
* Comparison of Linux distributions
* Comparison of Windows and Linux
* Comparison of open source and closed source
* The Cathedral and the Bazaar
* Free as in Freedom
* Linux software
* ISO/IEC 23360
* Plan 9 from Bell Labs - free successor of AT&T Unix
* Linux Documentation Project - Source of detailed documentation and How To manuals

References

Anonymous said...

Ah Man, I'm seriously going to miss reading this blog.

Good luck in the future. :)

Anonymous said...

You did a great service to Linux dude all this time. Bad publicity is better than no publicity at all!!
I hope that someone continues this blog...
Btw, 3 colleagues of mine installed Ubuntu this week and 2 others bought Aspire One with Linux...

Anonymous said...

There is nothing wrong with linux or windows. Its not the OS that fails but the operator instead. You only hurt yourself by limiting your options.

Desktop Linux is not an option. That is exactly the problem: it will never be because nobody wants to face the issues. You know, everyone who stands up and says openly why Linux never gets anywhere is a troll, or is in Microsoft's payroll.

We don't want people telling us how nice Linux is, or how we should use it. We want people telling the world how badly it sucks (and trust me, I know it does) because accepting it is the first one to try fix it. But it's not going to happen. Ever.

Haos said...

I`m gonna miss the blog so much. Not that it had to open my eyes, but always supported me with ammo to defend from freetard`s luser rants.

Wish LH all the best karma for his great work here

Anonymous said...

And freetards around the world rejoice. "We win!" they cry, "we can carry on just as we were before." Unfortunately they haven't realised if they carry on as they were before it's the people who try to use their operating system who lose.

Anonymous said...

He'll be back, just you wait and see! There's just too much Linux hate inside :)

Anonymous said...

All has been said.

You can't talk much about a piece of scrap of junk or a speck of dust, other than where it comes from and where is it going.

Once all has been said, you carry on with more important matters.

Anonymous said...

Hey, before you blog AGAINS something, use it for a month, and then see how you feel about it?
You're not afraid you are going to start liking it, are you?

Alexei said...

Too bad, your blog was entertaining - and educational.

Kinyua said...

include Linuxhater.h;
EXIT_FAILURE;

Anonymous said...

Hooray!
We can now live on falsely believing in the superiority of Linux!

AndyJ said...

Ahhhhh it was good whilst it lasted.

Thanks for the great blog and it's a very fitting end ;)

Anonymous said...

Open office 3, the solution to the world's apparent office problem (I guess Office suites were too stable), isn't naively supported in Ubuntu (apparently the best distro in the world that will solve world hunger and cause world peace), and won't be until the April release. Until that time you can install it by:
Download the file from OpenOffice.org
OOo_3.0.0_LinuxIntel_install_english-US_deb.tar.gz

Now you need to right click it and extract or run this command:
tar xzf OOo_3.0.0_LinuxIntel_install_english-US_deb.tar.gz

That will create a number of folders. Now move into those folders:

cd OOO300_m9_native_packed-1_en-US.9358/DEBS

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

Create a link on your Panel.
Right click the panel and choose “Add to Panel” and “Custom Application Launcher”.

Add this line to your command line and select an icon for the application in the panel.
/opt/openoffice.org3/program/soffice

Now click you icon on the panel and it will start.


from http://openofficedocs.wordpress.com/2008/10/14/install-openoffice-30-on-ubuntu/

Meanwhile it will naively install on 8 year old Windows 2000 (OK with SP2):
Download the installer

Run it.

Keep hitting next

You're finished

Compare the two. With this ease of software installation it's no wonder Linux is a runaway success.

Anonymous said...

Desktop Linux is a disgrace to those involved in software development. As a platform by and for dedicated programmers it's nothing more than an overvalued champion in underachieving.

- Documentation is an utter failure
- Coding for it is a nightmare
- Programming environments lag 10 years behind. Even 1990s W32 BorlandC is more advanced than the crap we're force-fed today on this mongrel

The word "Linux" on a resume is a dead give-away for stagnated development.

The silver lining: it enables employers to determine which ones should be locked up in the room with the server.

silix said...

Old first generation X11 applications work on current X11. If you can avoid distribution tweaks and talk straight to the X11 server no problems at all.

but the problem is just that
do we really want to talk straight to the x11 server, when virtually ALL current machines support hw accelerated shaders?

do we really want a server to render 2d primitives, when all current applications use toolkits which, in turn, can render them internally or via more efficient libraries (with some work, even hw accelerated ones - like openvg that could be the one modern and DE-agnostic standard) ?

do we really need X_CLIPBOARD when the major desktop environment each include its own clipboard manager?

do we really need to split the act of moving and resizing windows, from the policy that decides when and hown much to move or resize - when none out of all the other desktop oriented OS's, shows such a distinction, and usually have ONE low level graphic library and ONE integrated window management system , yet in some cases they retain customizeability (because behavioural/appearance function hooks are provided) ?

and, given Xorg's alleged "modularization", wouldnt it be neat to place those functions in a library, used by the current WM?

Compiz + X11 server makes desktop unstable even if you sit it there running just glgears no wm.

compiz is sometimes unstable on its own, but i suppose you have to add to the mix the direct/indirect rendering acceleraton infrastructure's volatility of these days...

Both have fixes major issue not widely deployed yet.

in a sane environment an important fix in a major subsystem would quickly propagate to all repositories where the current version of the system is accessed - bu possibly, to all occurrences of that system already deployed (i.e. all setups, including business and home ones)
of course, this would imply a massive testing work to ensure that this wide scale deployment of te fix doesnt break existing installs , and possibily a substantial design and implementation work to ensure that the platform is safe for such kind of fix deployment, that is , to ensure the platform's self compatibility across multiple installs of possibly multiple minor versions

on linux this is simply unfeasible - and either denying this, or pretending that "distributions" at the center of linux's deployment model, arent part of the problem, is like putting the head in the sand, imo

By the way you are partly right under 4 weeks to LSB 4.0 first stage of run your own ABI/API and don't care about distribution.

defining a standard code base is one thing that could and should have been done from the beginning - it wouldnt have hampered the system's evolution (in fact, they're othogonal aspects - many additions have been made by incrementally improving and solving problems, or by looking at how a problem was faced on other systems or on literature, not taking one solution over many - which would prove the fallacy of the "concurrency and choice" method in several cases)

this way distribution would have retained their role of "convenience (w/r to upstream) points of access" and wouldnt have contributed to the fragmentation of the platform

Section that is missing is unified update system design. Windows applications appear to get along quite well without that.

Of course they do - when every applications affers to the isv that made it, instead of an extraneous third party who happens to redistribute it,
there's no need for a "unified" application tracking system (not that windows's Application Add/Remove is such - it just contains links to the actual remover of each installed app) and the update facility can be optional and on a application basis

The Linux Desktop really does not change weekly. To be correct the raw interfaces barely change. So if you ship with your own tool kits you are mostly home.

problem is, I, and most other professional SW developers, dont want to have to reinvent the wheel each time (moreover, if every sw producer were to install his own set of function duplicating libraries, that would be avoidable code bloat, and would not be well received)
we want a platform to target, period

Past way staticly linked in kinda made updating hell. New LSB 4.0 dynamic linked so yep 1 update for all applications you make if anything on the desktop does change.

dynamic libraries were invented about 20 years ago IIRC
there's very little to be conceited about for deploying them when other operating systems have put them to good use for decades...

Anonymous said...

Ubuntu is getting slower with each new release.

Read for yourself how the lusers deny the problem:

Is Ubuntu Getting Slower?

Anonymous said...

"Ubuntu is getting slower with each new release.

Read for yourself how the lusers deny the problem:

Is Ubuntu Getting Slower?"

Its fun to watch them flip out over their pet distro.

Anonymous said...

What are you going to do next?

Put up Windows Hater's Blog?
OR Mac OS Hater's Blog?

Vexorian said...

If you do benchmarks in a laptop and forget to turn down power saving settings, ubuntu is getting slower.

Anonymous said...

@vexorian
You're fucking daft. Read the provided article link, and than you may have the right to comment.

Linux is slow and stupid, like its users.

Anonymous said...

I see all the "wintards" have come out. You know the wintards. To stupid to even figure out how to install linux even though there is a simple link and it virtually does the rest! Oh poor poor wintards. trying to hate on linux for being a superior system that takes 1 firing brain cell to operate. That is too much for them! Wintards are so stupid that they should use a mac so the system does the work FOR them!

Anonymous said...

To stupid to even figure out how to install linux even though there is a simple link and it virtually does the rest

I agree with you. For once, a freetard is right!

www.google.com

All you need to know about Linux is there. Go waste your life.

Claudio said...

Linux will win because UNIX is a real OS, DOS is toy for kids.

Anonymous said...

Don't dis the Dos, bro!
Master of Orion, Duke Nukem 3D
FTW!



Oh, and Linux still sucks.

Anonymous said...

No, Emacs is a real OS. UNIX is just an Emacs app.

Anonymous said...

Let's all move over to Roy Schestowitz's boycottnovell channel on FreeNode.
There are plenty of Linux turds over there to kick around. Of course we can also have some fun over in comp.os.linux.advocacy as well.

yngwin said...

So long and thanks for all the rants!

James said...

It was good while it lasted. Happy sailing, keep hating.

Tr0n said...

Too bad. You could have had multiple authors and kept it going...

Anonymous said...

I laughed out loud at the bit about how open source projects die!

But anyhow, as an Open Source developer myself I've read your comments from a slightly different angle, and sometimes - not always, but sometimes - I've thought to myself, "Yeah, he's *so* right", or "Yeah, he has a point". So, yeah, the results might not be immediately visible, but your insights *have* got through to some of us. ;)

I wish you all the best :)

Anonymous said...

LinuxHater runs on linux. how typically.

Thomas said...

Linux Hater,

I will miss you. You saved me from freetardom. You were the only one to point out out the elephant in open source room. Please don't go.

jc-denton said...

you don't have to update it, but please leave this blog for a while, in case a freetard comes asking about why i don't have linux on my desktop (or something), i just can send him to the concerning blog entries instead of having to explain everything again.

Anonymous said...

Anybody willing to fork this project?

makz said...

Your blog rescued me from freetardness, thanks a lot.

Anonymous said...

Monday, October 27, 2008 5:50 pm. One of your references mentioned it, but you never did: the wireless never workMonday, October 27, 2008 5:50 pm. One of your references mentioned it, but you never did (?): the wireless never works. I've tried 10 or twenty Linices, and no desktop wireless (see http://home.att.net/~owen_labs/rant11.htm#innerlinux). For normal users this is a deal killer, because we can't update Linux, which like all recently-released Linux *and* Windows software, is usually broken....
s. I've tried 10 or twenty Linices, and no desktop wireless. For normal users this is a deal killer, because they can't update the software

don_juan said...

Please don't stop. Lusers like me need you. You made me realize that Windows is not that bad for the Desktop, and that Linux is still far away from being the best OS for consumers. Thank you for preventing me from making a fool of myself trying to convert other people to Linux desktop. In the Linux Desktop charade, you are the little boy in this Emperor's clothes story.

Anonymous said...

How should I say...

Linux = 1
Windows = 0

Ah yes.

Anonymous said...

How should I say...

Linux = 1


Nope. 0.91%, actually :P

O_O said...

Digital information technology contributes to the world by making it easier to copy and modify information. Computers promise to make this easier for all of us.

Not everyone wants it to be easier. The system of copyright gives software programs “owners”, most of whom aim to withhold software's potential benefit from the rest of the public. They would like to be the only ones who can copy and modify the software that we use.

The copyright system grew up with printing—a technology for mass production copying. Copyright fit in well with this technology because it restricted only the mass producers of copies. It did not take freedom away from readers of books. An ordinary reader, who did not own a printing press, could copy books only with pen and ink, and few readers were sued for that.

Digital technology is more flexible than the printing press: when information has digital form, you can easily copy it to share it with others. This very flexibility makes a bad fit with a system like copyright. That's the reason for the increasingly nasty and draconian measures now used to enforce software copyright. Consider these four practices of the Software Publishers Association (SPA):

* Massive propaganda saying it is wrong to disobey the owners to help your friend.
* Solicitation for stool pigeons to inform on their coworkers and colleagues.
* Raids (with police help) on offices and schools, in which people are told they must prove they are innocent of illegal copying.
* Prosecution (by the US government, at the SPA's request) of people such as MIT's David LaMacchia, not for copying software (he is not accused of copying any), but merely for leaving copying facilities unguarded and failing to censor their use.

All four practices resemble those used in the former Soviet Union, where every copying machine had a guard to prevent forbidden copying, and where individuals had to copy information secretly and pass it from hand to hand as “samizdat”. There is of course a difference: the motive for information control in the Soviet Union was political; in the US the motive is profit. But it is the actions that affect us, not the motive. Any attempt to block the sharing of information, no matter why, leads to the same methods and the same harshness.

Owners make several kinds of arguments for giving them the power to control how we use information:

* Name calling.

Owners use smear words such as “piracy” and “theft”, as well as expert terminology such as “intellectual property” and “damage”, to suggest a certain line of thinking to the public—a simplistic analogy between programs and physical objects.

Our ideas and intuitions about property for material objects are about whether it is right to take an object away from someone else. They don't directly apply to making a copy of something. But the owners ask us to apply them anyway.
* Exaggeration.

Owners say that they suffer “harm” or “economic loss” when users copy programs themselves. But the copying has no direct effect on the owner, and it harms no one. The owner can lose only if the person who made the copy would otherwise have paid for one from the owner.

A little thought shows that most such people would not have bought copies. Yet the owners compute their “losses” as if each and every one would have bought a copy. That is exaggeration—to put it kindly.
* The law.

Owners often describe the current state of the law, and the harsh penalties they can threaten us with. Implicit in this approach is the suggestion that today's law reflects an unquestionable view of morality—yet at the same time, we are urged to regard these penalties as facts of nature that can't be blamed on anyone.

This line of persuasion isn't designed to stand up to critical thinking; it's intended to reinforce a habitual mental pathway.

It's elementary that laws don't decide right and wrong. Every American should know that, forty years ago, it was against the law in many states for a black person to sit in the front of a bus; but only racists would say sitting there was wrong.
* Natural rights.

Authors often claim a special connection with programs they have written, and go on to assert that, as a result, their desires and interests concerning the program simply outweigh those of anyone else—or even those of the whole rest of the world. (Typically companies, not authors, hold the copyrights on software, but we are expected to ignore this discrepancy.)

To those who propose this as an ethical axiom—the author is more important than you—I can only say that I, a notable software author myself, call it bunk.

But people in general are only likely to feel any sympathy with the natural rights claims for two reasons.

One reason is an overstretched analogy with material objects. When I cook spaghetti, I do object if someone else eats it, because then I cannot eat it. His action hurts me exactly as much as it benefits him; only one of us can eat the spaghetti, so the question is, which? The smallest distinction between us is enough to tip the ethical balance.

But whether you run or change a program I wrote affects you directly and me only indirectly. Whether you give a copy to your friend affects you and your friend much more than it affects me. I shouldn't have the power to tell you not to do these things. No one should.

The second reason is that people have been told that natural rights for authors is the accepted and unquestioned tradition of our society.

As a matter of history, the opposite is true. The idea of natural rights of authors was proposed and decisively rejected when the US Constitution was drawn up. That's why the Constitution only permits a system of copyright and does not require one; that's why it says that copyright must be temporary. It also states that the purpose of copyright is to promote progress—not to reward authors. Copyright does reward authors somewhat, and publishers more, but that is intended as a means of modifying their behavior.

The real established tradition of our society is that copyright cuts into the natural rights of the public—and that this can only be justified for the public's sake.
* Economics.

The final argument made for having owners of software is that this leads to production of more software.

Unlike the others, this argument at least takes a legitimate approach to the subject. It is based on a valid goal—satisfying the users of software. And it is empirically clear that people will produce more of something if they are well paid for doing so.

But the economic argument has a flaw: it is based on the assumption that the difference is only a matter of how much money we have to pay. It assumes that “production of software” is what we want, whether the software has owners or not.

People readily accept this assumption because it accords with our experiences with material objects. Consider a sandwich, for instance. You might well be able to get an equivalent sandwich either free or for a price. If so, the amount you pay is the only difference. Whether or not you have to buy it, the sandwich has the same taste, the same nutritional value, and in either case you can only eat it once. Whether you get the sandwich from an owner or not cannot directly affect anything but the amount of money you have afterwards.

This is true for any kind of material object—whether or not it has an owner does not directly affect what it is, or what you can do with it if you acquire it.

But if a program has an owner, this very much affects what it is, and what you can do with a copy if you buy one. The difference is not just a matter of money. The system of owners of software encourages software owners to produce something—but not what society really needs. And it causes intangible ethical pollution that affects us all.

What does society need? It needs information that is truly available to its citizens—for example, programs that people can read, fix, adapt, and improve, not just operate. But what software owners typically deliver is a black box that we can't study or change.

Society also needs freedom. When a program has an owner, the users lose freedom to control part of their own lives.

And above all society needs to encourage the spirit of voluntary cooperation in its citizens. When software owners tell us that helping our neighbors in a natural way is “piracy”, they pollute our society's civic spirit.

This is why we say that free software is a matter of freedom, not price.

The economic argument for owners is erroneous, but the economic issue is real. Some people write useful software for the pleasure of writing it or for admiration and love; but if we want more software than those people write, we need to raise funds.

For ten years now, free software developers have tried various methods of finding funds, with some success. There's no need to make anyone rich; the median US family income, around $35k, proves to be enough incentive for many jobs that are less satisfying than programming.

For years, until a fellowship made it unnecessary, I made a living from custom enhancements of the free software I had written. Each enhancement was added to the standard released version and thus eventually became available to the general public. Clients paid me so that I would work on the enhancements they wanted, rather than on the features I would otherwise have considered highest priority.

The Free Software Foundation (FSF), a tax-exempt charity for free software development, raises funds by selling GNU CD-ROMs, T-shirts, manuals, and deluxe distributions, (all of which users are free to copy and change), as well as from donations. It now has a staff of five programmers, plus three employees who handle mail orders.

Some free software developers make money by selling support services. Cygnus Support, with around 50 employees [when this article was written], estimates that about 15 per cent of its staff activity is free software development—a respectable percentage for a software company.

Companies including Intel, Motorola, Texas Instruments and Analog Devices have combined to fund the continued development of the free GNU compiler for the language C. Meanwhile, the GNU compiler for the Ada language is being funded by the US Air Force, which believes this is the most cost-effective way to get a high quality compiler. [Air Force funding ended some time ago; the GNU Ada Compiler is now in service, and its maintenance is funded commercially.]

All these examples are small; the free software movement is still small, and still young. But the example of listener-supported radio in this country [the US] shows it's possible to support a large activity without forcing each user to pay.

As a computer user today, you may find yourself using a proprietary program. If your friend asks to make a copy, it would be wrong to refuse. Cooperation is more important than copyright. But underground, closet cooperation does not make for a good society. A person should aspire to live an upright life openly with pride, and this means saying “No” to proprietary software.

You deserve to be able to cooperate openly and freely with other people who use software. You deserve to be able to learn how the software works, and to teach your students with it. You deserve to be able to hire your favorite programmer to fix it when it breaks.

You deserve free software.
This essay is published in Free Software, Free Society: The Selected Essays of Richard M. Stallman.

Please send FSF & GNU inquiries to gnu@gnu.org. There are also other ways to contact the FSF.
Please send broken links and other corrections or suggestions to webmasters@gnu.org.

Please see the Translations README for information on coordinating and submitting translations of this article.

Copyright © 1994 Richard Stallman
Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is permitted in any medium without royalty provided this notice is preserved.

Updated: $Date: 2008/10/07 06:48:58 $

Anonymous said...

This is the first entry of your blog that I've read, and it will be the last. You won't be missed, troll.

Elzair said...

Guys, in true OSS fashion, I just started a fork of Linux Hater's blog. If there have been previous forks, I don't care (also in true freetard fashion). Currently, it only has two posts, but I will try to add more soon.

thecodewitch said...

It is done. LinuxHater has left a legacy of helping the linux community see reality, so that it has a slight fighting chance to survive.

LinuxHater has demonstrated in the last couple of months that he has a real life to live - he has said what he came to say, and he has moved on to something better.

Thank you and good luck.

John Akromark said...

It's good that shit like this site is over now. We Linux guys rejoice for a newly won battle. I hope you or your site are never back.

Mario Cárdenas said...

Ranting is easy, constructing and helping is one hell more difficult. Good it's over, loser. Nobody's gonna miss you.

chungy said...

good riddance, go back to Windows you nonfreetard.

Vektuz said...

Last post

whitetigersx said...

@o_o
"Owners say that they suffer “harm” or “economic loss” when users copy programs themselves. But the copying has no direct effect on the owner, and it harms no one. The owner can lose only if the person who made the copy would otherwise have paid for one from the owner."

Great idea, but a) if they have a copy then they are interested in it, b) the company that wrote the code probably had to pay at least one person to write it and c) if I spend time writing code then I would really like to be compensated for it if I chose, not if the person using it chooses, remember it's all about choice. By not compensating the people that wrote it your are in essence denying them revenue for a product that you used, at least for a short while.

What Stallman is preaching is communism. In FOSSland sometime you code the program, sometime the code program you. People are greedy by nature and if they don't have to pay for something, there's probably a statistically good chance that they won't.

oh, and for all the unoriginal freetards who just copied and pasted someone else's argument, grow up and learn to think for yourselves.

Sneakernets said...

So I guess this is the end.


...


I never did get midi to work.

Anonymous said...

What you should have done, is started the blog with a partner. Then had an argument over something stupid about the blog. And instead of coming to an agreement or combining your ideas, split into 2 separate blogs.

And then since each blog has only half the man power, there is not enough time for either of you to cope and then both blogs stop.

Isn't that how it's done?

Anonymous said...

Thank you LH, for your insight and wisdom.

Linux is finally dead and buried.

Scott Rippon said...

:'(
Really sorry to hear you're pulling the plug. I really enjoyed your posts.

Anonymous said...

"Owners say that they suffer “harm” or “economic loss” when users copy programs themselves. But the copying has no direct effect on the owner, and it harms no one.

So, if somebody takes a GPL'd program and incorporates in a proprietary program, that shouldn't harm the community in any way. It's only a copy, and the community still has its original, right? Then, how come the freetards and Stallman get all upset when something like that happens?

Anonymous said...

noob

«Oldest ‹Older   1 – 200 of 893   Newer› Newest»